Young scientists shine

Four science students at University Centre Shrewsbury
(UCS) have been recognised by the Michael Davie
Research Foundation for their outstanding academic
achievements. Medical Genetics student Max Yates,
who graduated in September, was awarded the Final Year
Prize for achieving the highest marks across all modules
studied. Biochemistry third-year student Natalie Bailey
was awarded the Second Year Prize for achievement,
while Health and Exercise student Jennifer Hollins and
Jack Thompson, Medical Genetics, shared the First Year
Prize for academic achievement.

The Foundation is a Shropshire-based charity which seeks
to fund research and educational projects into human
disease, particularly bone disease. Founder Professor
Michael Davie said, “UCS has obviously filled a need for
high-quality science education and is attracting very able
students, who are responding to the teaching given by this
new venture.”

Jennifer Hollins, Max Yates, Natalie Bailey and Jack Thompson receiving their awards from Professor Mike Davie and Research Foundation Trustees at UCS

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