Historical place names

So think you know plenty about your local town of Brugg, Briegge or Brug Morse? (as Bridgnorth has been previously known)? Could you locate the Bannut Tree? Local historian Clive Gwilt has just published a fascinating booklet, the work of 40 years of research, entitled Places in and around Bridgnorth which charts some of the names given to familiar landmarks, streets and settlements – many going back as far as the Domesday Book, almost 1,000 years ago, and some even to Roman times. As to be expected, many are focused on the River Severn (or Sabrina to give it its Latin name) and demonstrate its huge importance in the development of the town as a trading port.
The book is on sale at Bridgnorth tourist information at the library for £3.

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